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The Touch
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The Touch

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Product Awards:  
Games Magazine Awards
Best Family Game Runner-Up, 2003

Ages Play Time Players
5+ 45-60 minutes 2-6

Manufacturer(s): Anthony Innovations

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Product Description

The Touch is an exciting and entertaining fast paced family table game, incorporating an innovative play container with unique spinning game board, built in timer and lighted observation area.

Based on the sense of touch, as the name implies, players challenge a sense often taken for granted. Through tactile perception, players compete to identify and collect toys, a reward that children especially love.

Challenge family and friends to a test of time and wit, developing lightening fast memory and finger dexterity. Race against the clock to find concealed pieces as fascinated opponents look on. Collect interesting play pieces and theme cards for points.

"An incredible sensation... almost seeing through your fingers to find the pieces!"

To play, players spin the game board to reveal a card on each turn. The 30 second timer is activated as the player reaches inside the container to find matching play pieces. Players lay "stake" to any card they draw at least one piece from. Play becomes faster paced with each successive round, as players search for pieces on their most recent card, as well as adding to any sets started on previous rounds. The game ends with the ultimate "sudden death" round for bonus points.

Players benefit from tactile stimulation, developing fine motor skills and strengthening sensory awareness. Playing The Touch builds confidence and brings family and friends together.

Product Awards

Games Magazine Awards
Best Family Game Runner-Up, 2003

Product Information

  • Manufacturer(s): Anthony Innovations

  • Year: 2001

  • Players: 2 - 6

  • Time: 45 - 60 minutes

  • Ages: 5 and up

  • Weight: 2,308 grams

  • In order to play The Touch, you will have to provide one 'AAA' battery


  • 20 theme playing cards
  • 49 detailed play pieces
  • components of easy-to-assemble play container
  • directions for play/assembly
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Product Reviews


Average Rating: 2.8 in 4 reviews

Why so cheap, and how did we live so long without it?
December 20, 2002

If you like fun, exciting games for the whole family, but which can also be played by mom and dad after kids are in bed, you will love 'The Touch.' This is indeed a game for the whole family, one of those you pull out and have everyone sit around and scream excitedly. The fun never ends; it never gets boring! Now, that we are used to how the pieces feel, it's even more exciting...Believe me!

When I ordered, I had no idea how well-crafted this game would be. Each individual piece is painted carefully to look like crabs, the earth, alien, pie, etc etc, and they aren't cheap plastic, but weighted vynil -- and feel great in your hands, in a child-play-doh-food-fun-toys-toys-toys type of way! They are just heavy enough, and have a lot of wit and character. The whole box where the pieces go, also, my gosh! The mechanism how you spin the bottom shelf and take off cards one by one is just perfect... and did you know there is a little light inside the dome, which works with a AAA battery? It really makes it fun to be behind the dome, look through the transparent plastic cover and see the kids trying to get the right pieces...

The final round is my favorite part, because everybody gets so worked up to get the most number of pieces identified... again, every game is completely different! It tests your memory as well as your tact... If you have to choose only one game for your family, please pick this one. It's a winner, hands down!

Unfortunately, I have no games that come even close to this one so that I could draw a comparison, because this one is so unique. Every detail is thought out, I wasn't disappointed in any way. It is worth every penny... and I would gladly have payed more for it. I truly wish the manufacturer makes more 'kits' of pieces and themed cards, because I would love to have more, more, more! Not that I NEED it, but I would love it nonetheless... just because the pieces are so much fun, the more the merrier, and the kids get a huge kick out of the 'Fun Facts' on the back of the cards. Maybe one with cards with more countries or cities, or other groups of food (maybe one called 'fruit', with apple, banana, pineapple, watermelon slice?)

Summary: God! I love this game! GIMME MORE!

If you have space and money, Touch this game!
May 15, 2003

The first thing you notice about the Touch when you see it's box is that it's BIG. It's one of the hardest boxes I have to put on my shelf. A huge game better be worth it, especially one with such a strange name as this. So is the Touch worth your time?

The shorter answer is, if you can afford the money and space - yes!

And now for the longer answer:

A short summary of the game follows:

The touch is a large, plastic game board, with a large area in the middle, in the shape of a bowl. This bowl is covered by another circle of plastic, creating a globe. This globe has 1/4 plastic window, where you can see inside it. On the opposite side of the plastic window is a small opening, with soft plastic, where one can put their hand inside the dome. On the outside of the globe is a large plastic circular board (the 'skirt') that rotates (spins) around the globe.

A pile of plastic pieces (toys) come with the game. They are all plastic or rubber, and are all quite different. They include a baseball, the Eiffel Tower, a U.F.O., a loaf of bread, and a giraffe. All 49 if these pieces are placed in the globe and mixed around. The game also comes with 20 theme playing cards. Each card has from 2 - 4 of the objects on it. Each card represents a specific theme. (Example: Baseball has a ball, mitt, and bat on it). These cards are placed into the 20 slots in the 'skirt'.

Each player then takes his turn. They spin the skirt around the dome. Whatever card is showing through the open part of the skirt is their current objective. On top of the dome is a thirty second manual timer. The timer is set, and the player sticks his hand through the opening in the dome and attempts (through touch only) to find the objects on his card. Any piece he correctly pulls out of the dome he keeps. However, once he draws an incorrect piece, his turn immediately ends. If the player has collected all the pieces on the card, he also keeps the card. Otherwise, the card is placed back into the skirt and the board is given to the next player. On future turns, the player is allowed to search for objects on the new card he spins, or continue to look for objects to match sets of objects he already has. Players can trade items and/or cards to try to get complete sets. Once all cards and objects are collected, scores are tabulated.

You get 10 points per object you have that is not a complete set.

You get 10 points for each card you have. (Whoever gets the last object from a set gets the card.)

You get 20 points for all objects in a complete set.

The game is not over yet - there is one final round. In this round each player tries to identify as many pieces correctly as possible in thirty seconds. Each piece done in this way is worth 10 points. After this round - whoever has the most points win.

Some comments about the game:

1) Assembly: This game is big! And it's a pain to put together. Once it's together, you have to really snap the plastic pieces in the skirt together right, or it won't spin correctly. But what's most annoying about the game is that it won't fit back in the box when assembled. This means that you keep it out of the box, or assemble and disassemble the game each time you play - which is very annoying.

2) Cards: The cards spinning around the board is nice, but why not a deck of cards? It would have saved a lot of room. Sure, it's fun to spin the thing, but is the hassle worth it?

3) Objects: The objects are great! Every single one feels different - but you would not believe how difficult it is to use your sensory perception when it's your turn. Many times I've seen a player pull out the globe when looking for the baseball. This game is actually educational in that sense - in that it does help develop your sensory perceptions.

4). Price, Support, and Availability: This game is currently not easy to find. Their web site has not been available for many months. This, coupled with how expensive the game is, has led me to believe that the game company is no more. The rule book promises expansions, but I cannot find word of them on the net. Fortunately, the base game is fine on its own.

5). Fun. All of the above may seem like I dislike the game - but I don't, because it's a lot of fun. When player is blindly groping about in the globe, all the other players can watch him through the plastic glass on the other side. It's hilarious to watch someone just miss the object they were seeking - or pick it up and drop it again. It's not boring when it's not your turn. Kids especially love this game.

6). Time: The time for the game is relatively short, about 45 minutes. That makes it an easy game to fit into our schedules. It's too bad that 15 minutes are used to set up and take down the game.

So if you can afford the price, the space on your bookcase, and the time to set the game up and put it away - you'll love this game. I'm not sure it has long time staying power (I feel like playing it maybe once every two months) - but when it comes out - it is a hit!

Tom Vasel

by Sean
Easy Access, Limited Fun
December 19, 2002

Always happy to try a new game that might be appropriate for young and old, I took a chance on 'The Touch'.

Sure, I was lured in by the unique concept and the story of the game's genesis. I looked at the picture of the game and decided that its over-the-top appearance was for me.

The game arrived in poor condition. One of the pieces ('SF Cable Car') was missing and the light for illumintaing the toy area was not working. The quality of the pieces was low--especially since the quality was touted on the box. Assembling the game was easy, but once assembled, a daunting question had to be asked: 'Where on earth can I store this?' The size of the assembled game is as big as a car tire. To take the game apart and reassemble it each time was unrealistic.

The play of the game was admireably simple and most people could be roped in to play within a few seconds. Ages and language barriers were not an issue. The first time you reach your hand into the pit was overwhelming. How can I ever find what I am looking for? Repeated plays, however, did breed technique and confidence.

Repeated plays, though, is the big question. Will people want to play this game frequently? Everyone smiles and is keen to try it out but not many people that I play with seem to want to play it more than once or twice. The Touch is quite a conversation piece but seems destined for nothing more than a novelty.

Show all 4 reviews >

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