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Wheedle
 
 
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Store:  Card Games, Family Games
Theme:  Stock Market
Genre:  Real-time, Trading
Format:  Card Games

Wheedle


List Price: $9.99
Your Price: $7.95
(20% savings!)
(Worth 795 Funagain Points!)

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Ages Play Time Players
9+ 20-30 minutes 4-6

Designer(s): Reiner Knizia

Manufacturer(s): Out of the Box Publishing

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Product Description

Wheedle:

  1. To persuade or attempt to persuade by flattery or guile.
  2. The game of stock taking and deal making.

Wheedle is the freewheeling stock trading game where 4-6 players jockey for corporate control. In a flurry of no-holds-barred trading, only the craftiest players will survive. The first player claiming majority control is the winner.

Break out WHEEDLE and rise to the top!

Product Information

Contents:

  • 61 Wheedle Cards
  • Quick Play Rules

Product Reviews

 
 
 
 
 

Average Rating: 3 in 1 review


 
 
 
 
 
PIT with a twist.
March 30, 2003

I might not have tried this game save for its designer, the prolific award-winning Reiner Knizia. I've always been very satisfied with his games, regardless of its target audience. Wheedle is one of his lite fun efforts that works well for the family or as a filler game in a game group.

The game consists of a deck of 61 cards in 9 suits, or corporations. The cards in each suit are identical, in that they are the same color, and feature the same corporate name and a number representing the total number of cards ('stocks') in that suit. The breakdown of suits looks like this:

5 'stock' suits: three

7 'stock' suits: four

9 'stock' suits: two

Cards are dealt out face-down to players (4 players - 15; 5 players - 12; 6 players - 10), with the last card place face-down on the table. Once everyone has arranged their hand, the dealer turns the card on the table face up, and the trading begins.

There are no turns; trading is simultaneous. Players call out what they have to offer and/or what they are looking for and swap cards. Calling out the colors vice the corporate names is best. Players need not keep the same number of cards in hand as they started with, so 2 for 1, or even 3 for 1 exchanges are occasionally tactically sound.

Also, at any time during the trading, a player may exchange a card in hand for the face-up card on the table.

So what's the object of the game? Well, players score 1 point for each card in hand of a suit they hold the majority of cards in (For instance, holding 5 of the 9 'black' Texas Tea Oil Company cards is worth 5 points.) If a player holds all of the cards in a corporation, they are each worth 2 points instead of 1.

When does it end? As soon as every card in player's hand can score points, he/she outs 'Stop!' At that instant, trading abruptly ends, and the 'stopper' lays down his/her cards.

If it turns out that the 'stopper' has a card that cannot score, he/she loses 5 points.

If every card in the 'stoppers' hand does score, he/she scores an additional 5 points.

All other players then score their hands according to the scoring scheme.

If this sounds a little like the old Parker Brothers game Pit, you're right.

But here's that twist: The card that is face-up on the table when trading stops is the 'bankrupt' corporation, and each card in that color scores -1 point.

A full game consists of playing as many rounds as there are players.

This game is definitely not for gamers who shy away from noisy, wild fun. You've got to trade aggressively and always keep an eye on the card on the table -- it may be one you're looking for, and it might negate a lot of points in your hand. We have enjoyed Wheedle, and I think it will continue to come out as a filler at our gaming sessions between heavier games like Puerto Rico and Taj Mahal.

If you're looking for a simple and raucous card game, this is it.

Other Resources for Wheedle:

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