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Store:  Family Games

The Omega Virus


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Ages Play Time Players
10+ 30 minutes 1-4

Designer(s): Michael Gray

Manufacturer(s): Milton Bradley

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Product Information

  • Designer(s): Michael Gray

  • Manufacturer(s): Milton Bradley

  • Year: 1992

  • Players: 1 - 4

  • Time: 30 minutes

  • Ages: 10 and up

  • Weight: 2,470 grams

Product Reviews

 
 
 
 
 

Average Rating: 4.2 in 5 reviews

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by Mike
It's a GREAT game
August 11, 2007

Another Thing about the game, is that you pick a password so that you know where the virus is. However, when you know it, the Virus then targets you... and so do other players

It's a GREAT game. I've had it for over 10 years and I can never get bored playing it.

 
 
 
 
 
Suprising
December 28, 2004

This game has many of the qualities that make "German" style games so popular.

1. Excellent components: Big, solid board with good graphics and movable panels. Tough, detailed player pieces. Well-designed electronic centerpiece.

2. Cooperative & competitive play: Our games often end up with the players cooperating to defete the virus.

3. Simple rules.

4. Balance between luck and strategy.

5. Everyone plays till the end and everyone has a chance to win till the end.

Another nice feature of this game is that there's a built-in time limit. This ensures that the game won't drag on and on into the early morning.

Overall this game is lots of fun and I would recommend it to anyone except possibly hard-core gamers looking for more strategy in a game.

-=Gabriel=-

 
 
 
 
 
One of our favorite games
August 30, 2004

This game appeals even to people who do not like board games. The built-in time limit means it will never last longer than 35 minutes (less for fewer than 4 players). There is added excitement because if you are too slow, the virus wins. Then everyone dies, and Earth is destroyed.

The computer is fairly clever, because it keeps track of who has the necessary pieces, making it hard to cheat much. It also prompts the player whose turn it is, so you never have to wonder who goes next.

The voices of the virus and the dying satellite computer are amusing. You'd think they'd get annoying, but the more we play, the funnier it is. You human scum! Try and stop me! 'help me, help me' ha ha ha ha!

 
 
 
 
 
by Nate D
'You Human Scum!'
July 03, 2004

That's what this game is all about. Hurrying through a labyrinth, exploring rooms, finding items, and trying to destroy a virus who taunts you with phrases like that of the title of this article.

This game is basically a gimmick game in which the gimmick is a talking computer into which you enter codes and press buttons in reaction to situations so that you can find the virus while avoiding his attacks.

How you accomplish the object of the game is by moving around the board from room to room, entering the codes for those particular rooms, and seeing what happens. What can happen is either an attack from the virus' security (in which you must energise your shields), teleportation to one of the four docking bays the finding of an access card to certain other rooms, the finding of a robotic probe (which is used to take a second turn, only this time being less limited in movement), or the finding of one of the three items necessary to finish the game.

Once all three items are found, the player can attack the virus, and if he or she hits the right button, he or she can win the game. The virus itself is found using a special code system involving the players personal secret codes, and the rooms that have those codes. It's really quite complicated, and every time I tried to explain it to my friends, they never really quite got it.

Personally, I find this game to be fun and entertaining. However, I must say that ti is lacking in replay value, because it gets annoying and boring after awhile. But it's a great game if you're looking for a party gimmick, or some cheap thrills. You'll most likely play it for a day or two when you first get it, and then keep it in the closet until friends come over or you're going to a party.

 
 
 
 
 
'Blue Must Die' 'Help Me, Help Me'
December 11, 2001

Positives: Due to the computer chip, you can play with only one person. Computer chip allows players to alter the level and the time allowed to play. This type of control allows you to set how long you want to, or are able to, play. So, if you have only 20 minutes to spare, you can still fit a game in. Computer continually spits out humorous taunts against the players, mocks them and their abilities, and decides on seemingly random players to decry and insist on the need for their imminent extinction. Game also allows players to help or hinder other players, depending on the moods of those participating at the time.

Negatives: Clumsy board and multitude of pieces seem to be Machiavellian in contrivance. The game relies on speed and concentration, and spending time attempting to clip your accessories onto your figure while writing down codes and moving two pieces around the board strikes me as a little evil. Of course, that may be your style. As with many electronic games, breakdown of the computer electronics renders the game nonviable.

Verdict: A fun, fast-moving game. Good for concentration, organizational skills, and quick thinking. The detractions to this fun simply do not seem to matter while playing, as the game does very well in setting an urgent mood.

Other Resources for The Omega Virus:

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