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24/7 The Game
 
 
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24/7 The Game


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Product Awards:  

Ages Play Time Players
8+ 20-30 minutes 2-4

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Product Description

Want to try 24/7 online? Click here to go to the manufacturer web site (link will open in a new window) where they've posted a great online version of 24/7 with a very challenging AI opponent! Play now!

24/7 the Game is an exciting strategy game that combines elements of luck and skill. Using durable plastic tiles on a full color game board, players take turns laying tiles on a 7×7 grid and score points for adjacent tiles that create runs, sets and sums of 24 or 7.

In 24/7, players score for combinations of tiles in four directions. While the importance of tile placement and strategy is key to winning, the element of luck magnifies as the combinations of tiles take shape in all four directions.

Play a tile and score points or block your opponent from scoring. In 24/7 the Game by playing the right balance between offensive and defensive placement, you’ll keep your opponents on their toes and rack up the points.

24/7 has an ingenious mechanic that constantly changes the landscape of the game board. No matter how many times you play, no two games are ever the same.

24/7 Basics (1.5 MB PDF file)

Product Awards

Product Information

  • Year: 2006

  • Players: 2 - 4

  • Time: 20 - 30 minutes

  • Ages: 8 and up

  • Weight: 1,195 grams

  • Language Requirements: Game components are language-independent. Manufacturer's rules are printed in multiple languages (including English). This is a domestic item.

Contents:

  • 40 tiles
  • 20 stones
  • 4 tile holders
  • 1 score pad
  • rules (English, German)

Product Reviews

 
 
 
 
 

Average Rating: 4.2 in 10 reviews

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by Ian Collier
Absolutely marvellous
May 20, 2007

I'm not sure where to start, to best get across to you just how much we love this game. There are plenty of reviews here that'll tell you how it's played, so I won't bother with that. What I will say however is number scrabble it ain't, unless all a game needs to fall into that category are tiles with numbers on. Better to describe it as a tile laying game and leave it at that. As for the theme, I think that 24/7 refers to how often you're going to want to play this game.

Anway, I thought I'd go through the things we love about this one by one - here goes:

  1. The gameplay: Simple - lay a tile, get some points (hopefully), pick a tile. Easy-peasy, everyone can manage this, making it one accessible game.

  2. The scoring system: Ingenious, with all sorts of options for getting those points, from sums to poker-like runs and sets to marvellous 'gotcha' moments when you pull off one of the special tile combos and win a very satisfying bonus. Yes, there's a lot to remember to begin with, but if (as we did) you're all learning together it means that you can grow into it together, and it gives the game a meaty and well-defined pair of legs, with lots of room for you to grow into, gradually improving and extending your game. Two games are rarely the same - at least, that's what we've found.

  3. The game length: Our first thought on seeing the board was 'wow, really small...', but it's perfectly formed. You've got enough space to enjoy yourself, but not so much that the game drags, and it's all over usually at just the right moment. Our games tend to come in at under 40 mins easily, which means plenty of scope for another go (and this time I'M going to win!).

  4. Portability: We're coffeeshop gamers, and this baby goes into a little bag and is playable on the smallest of tables. Point 3 comes in here too - you won't get thrown out for hogging the tables.

  5. Components: Top quality tiles, lovely wooden racks, stylish board, plenty of score sheets, really nice and super-tactile glass beads - 'nuff said.

  6. Scalability: Have I spelled that correctly? Oh well... terrific with four, awesome with three, fabulous with two, I can't think of many games that scale as well as this one.

  7. The designer: Not normally a consideration, but the lovely and super-generous Carey Grayson just HAS to have a mention in here. We knew we wanted this game when we saw it on the net, but everywhere we went that stocked it had sold out, and we really tried hard - Paris, Barcelona, Salzburg - all stripped of their stock. In desperation I got in touch with Sunriver Games directly, and Mr Grayson went several extra miles to personally help me get hold of a copy, so not only is he a number one game designer but a jolly good bloke too.

Seriously folks, this is an awesome game, that everyone we've played with has loved. Yes, it's got it's luck, but you'll need strategy and tactics too. Yes, there's maths involved, but nothing more complex than adding and counting, and we can all do that, surely? Play it light, play it heavy, play nice or play mean, I guarantee that there's a ton of fun in this game and something for everyone. We can compare it to other games, but at the end of the day it's unfair, because I honestly can't think of anything like this. It's clever, interesting, fun - unique. In fact, I recommend that - if you love your games - you'll buy this beauty right now. If you don't like it, I'll eat my hat.

 
 
 
 
 
Best Family Game
February 14, 2007

We have been playing 24/7 the Game for a while now, and our family has been enjoying it immensely.

This is the best family game as it is simple to teach, but as the game progresses, you must adjust your strategy as new and very interesting choices begin to emerge.

I really enjoyed how simple yet challenging this game was.

 
 
 
 
 
by Kelly
Enjoying the game
January 16, 2007

Ordered one for my 13 year old nephew who HATES math who played it with my husband, and really liked it! So I sent another game to my other 13 year old nephew in Ohio who thinks it is the best game ever! He and his dad have been having 24/7 tournaments every weekend and inviting friends, adult and kids, over to play also! I have three kids between 20 and 25 who have been enjoying the game and my youngest took it back to OSU with him to play in his dorm. Any game that can get these kids away from their video games and enjoy math has got to be fantastic!

Thanks for the great game!

 
 
 
 
 
Great game for school or home!
March 28, 2007

24/7 is a beautifully-made game (smooth heavy tiles, striking red glass beads, velvet drawstring bag) that is both fun and challenging to play. The game is quick (about 1/2 an hour) and the rules are simple and easy to learn and teach.

Others have already described the basic idea of the game, so I'll focus on how it plays. At this point, I've played 2, 3, and 4-player games and enjoyed all of them. Two-player games are the sneakiest/most strategic; four-player games are the "mathiest." That's because in a two-player game you have a greater likelihood of setting up a scoring possibility that you'll have a chance to use yourself, whereas in the four-player game, you spend more time analyzing the available options.

I've played this game at home one-on-one with an adult friend who loved it (she's an accountant) as well as with my usual gaming buddies (9 year old daughter, 20-something friend who works in a toystore, 40-something husband), all of whom enjoyed it. My daughter and I also donated a copy to her school's morning math games program. Everytime we get it out to play, the other 2 seats are instantly claimed (sometimes I relinquish my own spot to let a third kid play instead). Typically, it's 3rd graders (my daughter's classmate) who join us, but we do have a very math-oriented 1st grader who regularly joins us and often wins. And I'm confident enough that most 2nd graders can play (by the Spring) that I've just sent a copy to my nephew's classroom.

While the game itself requires only basic addition skills (up to 24), scoring (which could easily be left to an adult if necessary) involves multiplication. The scoresheet is very well designed from a math-teaching perspective. It involves minimal work while you're playing (simple tallying), it makes the logic of multiplication clear (did something multiple times), and provides experience with multiplying larger numbers using place value and then with adding them.

One tip I'd offer for teachers who are considering this game (or any other!) for classroom use is that team, cooperative, and/or coached play -- that is, any situation in which an individual isn't silently assessing his or her own options -- generally makes games more educational. It pushes kids to be explicit about their reasoning (so they can explain it to others) and to survey more options (hence do more math). This approach also stretches your budget for games because it turns a 4 player game into an 8 player game with kids working in pairs and making decisions together.

 
 
 
 
 
by Troudi
9 out of 10
December 06, 2006

Even if the game and the mechanism don’t sound particularly original or interesting – they turn out to be both, and very much so. Of course, one has to deduct something when playing with more than 2 people, even if this is a very interesting family game that challenges every player to plan ahead for one’s own moves and to estimate the moves of the other players – which is clearly more difficult than when playing with just 2 people.

This is where “24/7” has its particular strength: with 2 people, this board game becomes a highly tactical affair when the players try to snatch points from each other. Fundamentally, you should always keep an eye on stealing valuable points from the opponent by blocking a tile or if you at least block a move for the opponent, or if your own tile actually provides an opportunity to the opponent.

It is necessary to keep track of the tiles that have already been played, and to come up (through observation) with an idea of which tiles the opponent does not seem to have, or does not / can not play. With 2 players, “24/7” becomes a highly interesting and demanding board games with simple rules. For us, this is definitely one of the games that did not find the deserved attention at the 2006 Spielermesse in Essen.

 
 
 
 
 
by A Gamer
Great!
July 09, 2007

24/7 is a fun and simple game published by the really likeable company sun river games. the rules are explained in two minutes, and one game lasts at about 20 minutes - and then you wanna play again, as you want to improve your actions. basically you have to draw numbered tiles (manufactured very well, same as the whole gaming equipment!!) and have to think hard where to put it to complete a combination of numbers or sums to gain a lot of victory points. as there are so many possibilities, no game is like the other and lasting fun is guaranteed. great!!

 
 
 
 
 
by Jack Bauer, eh, Moritz Eggert
Very recommended
November 28, 2006

24-7 the Game is a great light game of number tile scoring, a bit reminiscent of but much better than Zatre (which plays much slower). Sunriver Games has again managed to produce a winner!

Very recommended – for all kinds of gaming groups.

Rules: bilingual (German and English), can be explained in 2 minutes
Game material: impeccably good
Game length: 20 minutes, and you want to play again immediately

Moritz Eggert

 
 
 
 
 
Number Scrabble - eh, maybe. Fun for two.
May 15, 2007

24/7 the Game (Sunriver and Funagain Games, 2006 – Carey Grayson) may very well have one of the thinnest themes I’ve seen in a game. Yes, the numbers “24” and “7” nicely match up with the theme of time, but that’s about it; 24/7 is mostly a numerical math puzzle-type game. There are many ways to describe the game, but I certainly feel as if “mathematical Scrabble” comes fairly close.

I’m someone who enjoys numerical games such as this, and 24/7 scratches my itch fairly well – it’s interesting enough to keep my attention, yet not so much of a brain burner that my mind paralyzes mid game. Players attempt to find the best combinations; and while there is some luck of the draw, future planning and logic come into play, enough that I’m convinced the better player will win most games. Puzzle enthusiasts may have a more enjoyable time than most with the game, but it’s light enough to have family appeal.

The board consists of a seven by seven grid of squares, and each player takes a rack, drawing five tiles (six in a two-player game) from a bag. There are forty tiles in total, four of each number from “1” to “10”. One tile is placed face up in the middle space of the board, and three are secretly removed from the game. One player is given a score sheet, and a pile of “Time Out” stones is placed near the board. The player whose age is closest to twenty-four goes first, and then play proceeds clockwise.

On a player’s turn, they simply play a tile adjacent to any tile on the board, and then draw a new tile back into their rack. Every time a tile is placed, it forms a line of tiles (quite possibly more than one line). These lines are immediately examined to see if the player scores any points. Players receive points for completing one or more of the following combinations.

  • The sum of all the tiles in the line equals exactly “7” or “24”
  • Three or four of the same number are in a row
  • There is a “run” of tiles (“2”, “3”, “4”, etc.) of three, four, five, or six tiles.
Each combination scores a player from twenty to sixty points. If the tile the player places covers a “double time” space on the board, then they score double the points for combinations they make at that point. Players can also get a bonus if they get the “24” and “7” combination using the same tile, or if they form “24” with exactly seven tiles.

No line can ever have a higher sum than “24”. When a line reaches “24”, then time out stones are placed in the spaces on both ends, since no tiles can be played there any longer. If players see a space during the game that can no longer be legally played upon, then time out stones are placed there also.

The game continues until either all players have used all their tiles, or there is nowhere else to place tiles. At this point, players total their scores, and the game ends. The player with the highest score wins (ties broken by the amount of tiles left, but I’ve never seen a tie).

Some comments on the game…

  1. Components: The game comes in a large square box, possibly larger than is necessary, but the pieces fit inside easily. The board is a medium-sized board and has some nice background graphics that bring out the minimalistic theme, yet aren’t too intrusive. The tiles themselves are satisfying to hold – with a nice, chunky, almost domino like quality about them. When played on the board, the entire game has an almost austere quality about it, giving off vibes of high quality. Once again, I will point out that the theme of the game is fairly non-existent; while I know that it matches the numbers, it doesn’t mean too much to me. And there’s really no way I’m telling people they just scored 50 minutes instead of 50 points. Still, it’s better than no theme.

  2. Rules: The rulebook is only three pages long, but they are large pages with a large, easy to read font. Color illustrations and examples are shown, and I was able to figure it out in about two minutes – and explain it just as quickly. Some things need to be emphasized, such as the fact that a run or set can be part of a longer line, or exactly when you score bonuses, but for the most part it’s an easy game that can be understood by anyone who can do multiple addition in their heads.

  3. Players: The game works with three or four players, but I find that it is at its best with two (or possibly using the variant of teams of two players). With two players, you have more control, and the draw of tiles is less important. It’s also easier to set up a run or set, without the fear that another player might steal it before you have the chance to play a tile. I’m not saying that a four-player game isn’t fun – it is; but it’s more of a casual, light game, while the two-player game can really be a battle of wits.

  4. Comparisons: The game immediately reminded me of Scrabble, in that you are forming rows of tiles, and there are “double score” spaces on the board. I was also reminded of the game Kingdoms, in which players are placing tiles for numerical rows and columns on a grid-like board. But, even though these comparisons come to mind – and I’ve seen them printed in other places on the ‘net -- I don’t think they are overly accurate. 24/7 is its own game, and as simple as it is, it feels fairly unique in its scoring and game play.

  5. Luck vs. Strategy: One can watch all the tiles that have been played and use them in comparison to the tiles on their rack to set themselves up for future plays. Obviously there is some luck to the game; if you are the only person to get the four “6” tiles, it’s a good day for you. But players can still mitigate the luck of the opposing player by playing more aggressively, placing tiles simply to block their opponent. Even when I’ve lost the game, I felt that it was because of poor tile placement on my part, rather than luck of the draw.

  6. Fun Factor: As much as I enjoy the game, I also realize that a lot of people may not like the math involved, even though I think it’s fairly simple. For me, the fun of the game comes from that “aha!” moment, when you can place the last tile into position that finishes two rows and scores the big bonus. I also get a kick out of proving which spaces can no longer have a tile legally played in them. Some folks aren’t up for this, and some folks can drag the game out past the thirty-minute mark that most of mine have fallen into – simply by belaboring each choice. The choices are simple and not as varied as one might think - actually increasing the value of an abstract game such as this.

  7. Ending: One minor negative point about the game – it tends to peter out rather than end enthusiastically. In the last fourth of the game, tile options are rather limited, and the game play isn’t nearly as intense as the middle. Usually the winner is somewhat obvious about 4/5 of the way through, although we always play out – just in case.

If you are looking for a nice two-player game (with the option of going up to four) that is slightly abstract, yet is a fun, beautiful looking mathematical game – 24/7 is for you. I laugh as I look back on that statement, because it tends to sterilize the game more than I intend – 24/7 is a light fun game that actually holds a bit more strategy behind the surface than first obvious. Make no mistake – it will never be considered a classic on the lines of Chess or Go, but it is a pleasant diversion and one that may have considerable staying power.

Tom Vasel
“Real men play board games”

 
 
 
 
 
Challenging and fun!
March 06, 2007

The full review of 24/7 appears in May issue of Knucklebones magazine. What follows is an abbreviated version.

Released by SunRiver Games, 24 / 7 challenges players to play tiles so as to form runs or sets of numbers, or to accumulate totals valuing “7” or “24”. In spite of this rather mundane objective, the tight grid of numbers makes spotting possible scoring opportunities quite challenging and fun.

The game is played with four sets of tiles numbered 1 – 10 and a board depicting a 7x7 grid, upon which the tiles will be played. Armed with an initial hand of 5 or 6 tiles, players alternate placing one tile at a time onto the board. The objective is to form runs of 3 – 6 consecutive numbers, sets of 3 or 4 numbers, or cause a cumulative total of “7” or “24” points. Points are tracked on a score pad, with victory going to the player achieving the most points when no further tiles can be played.

A tile must be played adjacent – horizontally, vertically or diagonally – to any previously placed tile. Scoring is immediate if a player successfully achieves a run, set or total as described above. If a “double time” space is covered, any score is doubled. Bonuses are earned if a player scores both a total of “7” and “24” with the placement of a tile, or if he achieves the sum of “24” by placing the 7th tile in that row. After placing a tile, a replacement is drawn.

An important rule is that no line of tiles can total MORE than 24, so some “dead” spaces will occur. These are marked by stones, which reduce the placement options as the game progresses.

Strategy wise, the game primarily relies on spotting ideal locations to optimize scores. This is more of a matter of being observant as opposed to any real strategic prowess. Sure, there are some strategies to employ, but the overall skill is one of spotting the optimum placements. There is a bit more control when playing with just 2-players, but the game is also fun and challenging with a full contingent of four.

24 / 7 is a fun, family game along the same lines as games such as Sequence or 5ive Straight. There isn’t a huge amount to think about, but there are enough decisions to be made to feel one’s victory is deserved rather than happenstance. Spending time with 24 / 7 is certainly time well spent.

 
 
 
 
 
by Greg J. Schloesser
Time well spent
October 20, 2010

Designer: Carey Grayson
Publisher: SunRiver Games
Review by: Greg J. Schloesser
2 – 4 Players, 20 – 30 minutes

NOTE: This review was first published in Knucklebones magazine Released by SunRiver Games, 24 / 7 challenges players to play tiles so as to form runs or sets of numbers, or to accumulate totals valuing “7” or “24”. In spite of this rather mundane objective, the tight grid of numbers makes spotting possible scoring opportunities quite challenging and fun.

One would think that with a name like “24 / 7”, this game would somehow be related to time. Well, in a VERY loose way it is, as the rules are steeped in time-related terminology. There are “time out” stones, “double-time” spaces, and points are termed “minutes”. It is a gallant attempt to give a theme to a decidedly abstract game.

The game is played with four sets of thick tiles numbered 1 – 10 and a board depicting a 7x7 grid, upon which the tiles will be played. Three tiles are removed prior to the game, eliminating the possibility of foolproof “tile” counting. Armed with an initial hand of 5 or 6 tiles, players alternate placing one tile at a time onto the board. The objective is to form runs of 3 – 6 consecutive numbers, sets of 3 or 4 numbers, or cause a cumulative total of “7” or “24” points. Points, termed “minutes” in game parlance”, are tracked on a score pad, with victory going to the player achieving the most “time” when no further tiles can be played.

A tile must be played adjacent – horizontally, vertically or diagonally – to any previously placed tile. Scoring is immediate if a player successfully achieves a run, set or total as described above. If a “double time” space is covered, any score is doubled. Bonuses are earned if a player scores both a total of “7” and “24” with the placement of a tile, or if he achieves the sum of “24” by placing the 7th tile in that row. After placing a tile, a replacement is drawn.

An important rule is that no line of tiles can total MORE than 24, so some “dead” spaces will occur. These are marked by “Time Out” stones, which reduce the placement options as the game progresses.

Strategy wise, the game primarily relies on spotting ideal locations to optimize scores. This is more of a matter of being observant as opposed to any real strategic prowess. Sure, there are some strategies to employ, primarily keeping a good range of numbers available for placement, especially low-valued numbers. The overall skill, however, is one of spotting the optimum placements. There is a bit more control when playing with just 2-players, but the game is also fun and challenging with a full contingent of four.

24 / 7 is a fun, family game along the same lines as games such as Sequence or 5ive Straight. There isn’t a huge amount to think about, but there are enough decisions to be made to feel one’s victory is deserved rather than happenstance. Spending time with 24 / 7 is certainly time well spent.

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